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Let there be light.
GL0Be 
11/8/08 11:42:06 PM
Hero
Immortal


Its all about light!

OK I'm a total newb at this whole photography thing, but one thing I am learning (besides studying the manual daily) is the importance of light.

I never really thought about it before, the importance of light. I remember some years ago happening on the set of Cop Shop being filmed near the Yarra River. I stood around for an hour or so watching them. I found it odd and interesting the amount of time they fugged about with the lighting.

I always thought it was "Scene 1, take 1 ACTION!" and away they go, but for over an hour all they did was fugg about with the lighting. I was young, thought it was boring and moved on.

Now I understand how important it is, even for a crappy soap like Cop Shop :P

The lighting sets the whole mood of the scene your shooting. But I'm eager to learn from those who know their stuff about lighting.

It will be interesting to get your take on lighting, its importance and what you've learnt over the years about it and photography.

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Athiril 
11/8/08 11:55:13 PM
Titan

Well its not all about light.. it's all about shadows actually... >_>

Lol, not yanking your chain, that is what lighting is about, creating the right shadows (or shading in an artists term), if you think like a painter, and look up painting lighting/shading styles it's easier to comprehend.

If you have something specific to learn i could point you in the right direction..

edit: and yeah if youre shooting film and not video, you cant afford to waste film stock, it's expensive stuff!


Edited by Athiril: 11/8/2008 11:58:10 PM

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GL0Be 
12/8/08 12:05:54 AM
Hero
Immortal


Quote by Athiril


If you have something specific to learn i could point you in the right direction..


Edited by Athiril: 11/8/2008 11:58:10 PM



Glad you asked :P

http://www.rodneyhyett.com.au/Photo%20Pages/08artillery.html

That photo there - teach me how to do shots like that :)

Gummybear posted up similar stuff in a thread, and he gave me some tips, but are those types of photos photoshoped or is there a way to replicate that image using certain techniques and hardware?

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Athiril 
12/8/08 12:23:48 AM
Titan

Yeah, you see this down on film a lot.

You need a tripod, or somewhere to put your camera where it wont move.

You need to get an exposure time of at least 1 second for a good amount of silky water (more for slow moving stuff).

Without a neutral density filter, you'll need to shoot post-sunset or pre-sunrise, as there will be just too much light to do an exposure that long (even at f/22).

That would use a neutral density and a grad neutral density for the clouds (neutral density is grey glass, restricts amount of light allowing longer exposure, gradual neutral density goes from dark to nothing in half the glass, grad's are square filters that use holders, cheap ebay replicas do fine, and dont destroy image quality like people reckon, search for Cokin P on ebay)

A grad ND is a must when the sky is significantly brighter than the ground, so much that you'll overexpose the sky or underexpose the ground by a huge amount without it.

So you'll need a grad ND or to do HDR.

Post sunset though... the exposure evens out where you dont need one (or an ND).

There is a way to do it without ND or grad ND, assuming you get good exposure in a single shot (with or without HDR), you combine multiple images (digital multiple exposures) a whole heap, that show you the motion of the water, of course, shoot with a tripod with this method too.

Shooting in RAW... when you develop RAW you can recover (to a certain extent) what appears to be blow out highlights through careful processing.

Here is an old one I did, it was quite dark where I was so I could shoot this without filters

This is f/16, ISO 100 and 1/4th of a second (luckily the water was fast moving!)
http://ulfhednin.deviantart.com/art/Above-Nellie-s-Glen-63374119

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The Tick 
12/8/08 9:18:06 AM
Hero
Titan


https://www.camerasdirect.com.au/index.php/vmchk/tutorial-dvds/photography-dvds/blue-crane-unders

Really nice tutorial about the speedlites and working with them.

The 430ex speedlite was one of the best things I bought. I really need to get one of the cables that allow you to move it off the top of the camera now.

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I don't care who makes what, I just want more toys.



gummybear 
12/8/08 10:39:10 AM
Champion

lol i think globe's got a bad case of the photography itch. a few more weeks and we can head up to GoR. that photo you posted is really nice, i like it.

i'm still yet to post up the originals for you, computers been formatted a million times since upgrade so still sorting that out.

without showing you what the original looks like this is all i did in photoshop:

background layer (orignal photo)

duplicate background layer > filter > other < high-pass (i use 20%)
(high-pass sharpens the image a little bit without being too over bearing like when you use the sharping filters)

set the duplicated layer blend to 'soft light'

flatten image

new adjustment layer > black / white gradient

set that adjustment layer to 'soft light'

and thats it, i found that by using the black/white gradient to soft light it really contrasted the rock with the water making it stand out more.

and yeah will have to agree with the tick, i love my 430ex. buy it you won't regret it but read up on flash photography too =P

edit: oh and i used the rubber stamping tool to clean up the water splashes.

my camera almost fell in the water at one stage when a massive wave came up that i wasn't expecting, needless to say i was WET!



Edited by gummybear: 12/8/2008 10:40:18 AM

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cmos 
12/8/08 4:42:03 PM
Overlord

Quote by Athiril
Yeah, you see this down on film a lot.

You need a tripod, or somewhere to put your camera where it wont move.

You need to get an exposure time of at least 1 second for a good amount of silky water (more for slow moving stuff).

Without a neutral density filter, you'll need to shoot post-sunset or pre-sunrise, as there will be just too much light to do an exposure that long (even at f/22).

That would use a neutral density and a grad neutral density for the clouds (neutral density is grey glass, restricts amount of light allowing longer exposure, gradual neutral density goes from dark to nothing in half the glass, grad's are square filters that use holders, cheap ebay replicas do fine, and dont destroy image quality like people reckon, search for Cokin P on ebay)

A grad ND is a must when the sky is significantly brighter than the ground, so much that you'll overexpose the sky or underexpose the ground by a huge amount without it.

So you'll need a grad ND or to do HDR.

Post sunset though... the exposure evens out where you dont need one (or an ND).

There is a way to do it without ND or grad ND, assuming you get good exposure in a single shot (with or without HDR), you combine multiple images (digital multiple exposures) a whole heap, that show you the motion of the water, of course, shoot with a tripod with this method too.

Shooting in RAW... when you develop RAW you can recover (to a certain extent) what appears to be blow out highlights through careful processing.

Here is an old one I did, it was quite dark where I was so I could shoot this without filters

This is f/16, ISO 100 and 1/4th of a second (luckily the water was fast moving!)
http://ulfhednin.deviantart.com/art/Above-Nellie-s-Glen-63374119



Also, polarisers cut down the amount of light reaching the sensor, helping extend shutter times.

Here's my attempt taken at Philip Island

http://www.flickr.com/photos/charliestarke/2460252265/sizes/o/

.6s @ f/29

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I no longer want to be a man. I want to be a horse. Men have small thoughts. I need a tail. Give me a tail. Tell me a tale.

Athiril 
12/8/08 6:00:10 PM
Titan

Ah yes.

Polarisers can also be a substitute for grad ND's as you can darken the sky with them.

In fact I recommend always carrying one, as you can really punch up the cloud's contrast with them.

They can also change the colour of water and sea.

For example the river where I am sometimes flows red (and by this, I mean basically blood red), pointing at the water with an obtuse angle and a polariser, you can isolate the red.. or seemingly turn it back to blue in certain angles towards the sun.

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