Home
Wednesday, August 23, 2017
10:38:40 AM
Users online: 0   You are here >> Home > 3D Design

Forums | 3D Design Forums search
Forum FAQ
   
  1  
My initial foray into animation.
nickeax 
4/1/08 1:29:08 AM
Banned

Hi 3d folk!

I'm a hobbyist 3D modeler, using 3D Canvas Pro from Amabalis. I can't afford the big programs, but for my simple little tasks, 3DC is very powerful.

I just wanted people to critique my first attempt at realistic movement. It's a jumping dog:

http://www.bandofgreen.com/animations/SpaceDogs/Jump0001.wmv 1.98MB

I know I have zero modeling skill compared to you guys, but I think after playing around for a while at my own pace, I'll get better at it.

Cheers.

-----
colour monitor|wireless mouse|internal hard drive| TWO floppy drives|colour plotter|graphics card|80 column display


xfu 
4/1/08 12:09:21 PM
Champion

The main thing is that it's very "floaty".

If it's the effect you're going for then disregard.

He should fall A LOT faster. 4 times faster at least I think.

Other things:

* use 2-4 frames of anticipation before the jump. Make him sink a little before leaping.

* The head follow-through on the way down is almost right, but not quite. I think if his head points upwards just a little later in the cycle, it'll look more like the 'whiplash' sort of effect that it should be. Think about follow-through as a delayed chain reaction rather than synchronous movements. The head tilt should also ease in as the body drops. The tail is good.

* this slightly contradicts previous point - the dog is very limp. Follow-through is important, but you could give him some extra movement as well. incorporate some tail wag, make the head look to the side hear and there as he jumps up and down, etc.

-----
http://www.betarecords.com/psiom

africa 
4/1/08 2:27:40 PM
Primarch

hmm true, its very slow and looks low gravity. Very good for a first try mate keep at it and you'll be great in no time

-----
ATTACK TUB!

nickeax 
4/1/08 3:07:46 PM
Banned

Thanks for the help guys. The tips are very helpful.

-----
colour monitor|wireless mouse|internal hard drive| TWO floppy drives|colour plotter|graphics card|80 column display


superfireydave 
5/1/08 2:12:28 AM
Guru

Nickeax - try rotoscoping. Take a video of a dog jumping, and animate your model to the video.

-----
Mreow?

nickeax 
6/1/08 2:05:26 PM
Banned

Quote by superfireydave
Nickeax - try rotoscoping. Take a video of a dog jumping, and animate your model to the video.



Awesome idea. That would allow me to really get cosy with timing and body reactions to movement.

Cheers!

-----
colour monitor|wireless mouse|internal hard drive| TWO floppy drives|colour plotter|graphics card|80 column display


Pretty_Boy 
7/1/08 10:17:57 AM
Overlord

+1 to superfireydave's idea.

-----
ASUS M2N-E - HIS x1950xt - Thermaltake Toughpower 750w - 4 x 512mb Kingston HyperX - Am2 3800+ X2
Atomic 3D work! check it out! http://www.atomicmpc.com.au/forums.asp?s=2&c=34&t=14

Charcoal 
7/1/08 11:45:04 AM
Hero
Immortal


Also remember, a perfect rotoscope will usually look fairly wierd in 3D.

You'll still need to tweak it...

-----
Site: http://www.charcoalstyles.com/
Blog: http://virb.com/charcoal

New Project: http://www.charcoalstyles.com/3drl/

There were plans for world domination?
And it included me making a blog?

superfireydave 
7/1/08 3:29:16 PM
Guru

Quote by Charcoal
Also remember, a perfect rotoscope will usually look fairly wierd in 3D.

You'll still need to tweak it...


If you're decent at animation or have some knowledge of rotoscoping, it wont be a problem. You can take a a video from x,y and z and if you rotoscope properly, it looks exactly like the video and the natural animation [which is the whole idea]

Hell, even if you just get it from one angle [usually the side view, so looking at the dog's length and height] you can get a really good feel for how the animations progresses.

-----
Mreow?

xfu 
7/1/08 3:48:01 PM
Champion

Rotoscoping is a good idea for reference and some extra perspective, but as an "initial foray into animation", I wouldn't get too carried away an advanced rotoscoping execution. That side-on idea is probably all you need, just as a movement study and rough guide.

Keep your focus on core animation skills and how to apply all the principals of natural movement intuitively.

It's pretty unlikely you'll film a dog jumping exactly the way you intend, and if this was (hypothetically) needed for a specific project, it's always better to have the skills and knowledge to nail it from scratch.

There are some great books you should get, such The Animator's Survival Kit. Priceless, for anyone serious about it.

-----
http://www.betarecords.com/psiom

nickeax 
7/1/08 11:27:49 PM
Banned

I would find it difficult to perform XYZ rotoscoping with the software I use, I think. But I can imagine the benefits will be good.

And I should mention that I just do this for fun, as a hobby. I do not plan to take it any further than that. Of course, I still wish to do it as well as I can though.

-----
colour monitor|wireless mouse|internal hard drive| TWO floppy drives|colour plotter|graphics card|80 column display


superfireydave 
8/1/08 3:09:56 AM
Guru

Well XYZ isn't really necessary, it's just what you CAN use to get it 100% perfect [even then, it takes a bit of skill but I digress]

Personally, I tend to use the length view. If you can't position a video as a texture, simply have the video open in a window beside the 3d one, and note relevant major movements the dog makes etc and change your model to look like that :)

I've found it the quickest and easiest way to make something that looks really cool.

-----
Mreow?

SquallStrife 
14/1/08 2:27:01 PM
Guru

His rear-right leg is kinda flailing. Was that intentional?

-----
As part of required test protocol, we will stop enhancing the truth in 3...2...1...

  1  
Forums | 3D Design