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Laptop with power button on the outside
robzy 
31/8/08 8:50:06 PM
Hero
Immortal


Hey guys,

Looking for a laptop for my grandfather to replace his old 1.4Ghz Athlon desktop.

The aim of the laptop is that if he has any troubles with it, it makes it easier for it to be transported backwards and forward.

It will be plugged into his existing keyboard, mouse, lcd, etc.

I was thinking about an eeePC or similar, but with the power button being on the inside it means it has to be opened either
a) All the time
b) Whenever he wants to turn it on

All in all it's not a deal breaker, but I'd like to avoid the hassle if possible.

Does anyone have any suggestions as to a sub-$1000 laptop with the power button on the outside?

Rob.

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tantryl 
31/8/08 9:25:58 PM
SuperHero
Immortal


As a general rule all notebook power buttons are on the internal plane of the keyboard. There may be the odd exception but they're few and far between.

Just disable the "shut down/sleep when I close the lid" function and you can close the lid and it keeps on ticking.

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Jeruselem 
31/8/08 10:57:47 PM
Guru

Never seen one like that since you put the power button on the inside so you can't turn on the laptop by accident. And also laptop makers don't want to be fixing broken on/off switches on the outside of the laptop knowing how laptops get treated by some people.


Edited by Jeruselem: 31/8/2008 11:02:12 PM

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stadl 
1/9/08 1:25:15 PM
SuperHero
Titan


The HP2133 Mininote has the power button on the front.

But if you want small size but not the laptop formfactor, look into something like thre Asus eebox or one of the acer/asus ultracompact desktops. Most of these are about the size of a medium sized textbook, offer an integrated DVD drive etc.

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Apocrypha 
1/9/08 2:10:51 PM
Master

Dell Studio 15, its on the right hand side external hinge.

$1099, but its a proper PC.

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robzy 
1/9/08 3:42:06 PM
Hero
Immortal


Yeah, I thought I may have been asking for too much :P Any laptops that support being turned on via the keybaord then?

stadl: I shall look into the HP, thanks. As for an ultra compact desktop, that isn't a terrible idea.

Apoc: If we are going proper PC then I'd prefer to build one myself for much less than that :P

Rob.

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The Tick 
1/9/08 4:14:57 PM
Hero
Titan


Perhaps you should look for one that supports a docking station. At least the power button would be located there.

EOL business notebooks are great for this kind of purchase. Even IBM R61s which were going for ridiculous amounts on catch of the day have docking stations available.


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stadl 
1/9/08 4:53:27 PM
SuperHero
Titan


While I mentioned the mini note simply because it has the external power, for the performance offered, it is a very expensive way of building a compact box like you are describing.

The mininote is a good budget subnotebook for 4 reasons - build quality, screen resolution, keyboard size and I/O.

Conversely the mininote is a relatively bad budget subnotebook if you consider price and battery life.

It would be a waste to buy one and keep it closed, thus avoiding two of it's main advantages (the screen and keyboard). Much cheaper using a eeePC, Aspire One, MSI Wind etc if you don't care what the user interface is like. Better and cheaper yet to get the eeeBox.

Be warned though that any Intel Atom or VIA C-7M based subnotebook/compact PC will not be any faster than the ageing Athlon 1.4G - other than perhaps a machine that age may not have 1GB RAM. These processors are all intended to perform at about Celeron 700-900MHz speeds, just using less power.

-----
...so brilliant in fact, that by simply harnessing the power of one live frog, it.. it.. uhh.<poke> <poke>
World domination has encountered a momentary setback. Talk amongst yourselves.

Waffles, Lots of Waffles... And Chips...

tantryl 
1/9/08 5:13:04 PM
SuperHero
Immortal


Quote by robzy
Yeah, I thought I may have been asking for too much :P Any laptops that support being turned on via the keybaord then?



I can't possibly be understanding what you're after since the combination of wanting no internal power button followed by preferring a keyboard stroke to start the thing up doesn't make much sense.

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robzy 
1/9/08 7:27:29 PM
Hero
Immortal


Thanks for the suggestion The Tick.

stadl: The Intel Atomic really has the same performance as the Athlon 1.4G? Really? Wow, I expected it to have more. My old man's eeePC 701 seems to perform well (then again, it has 1Gb RAM).

tantryl: The logic of choosing a laptop is that if something goes wrong we can just say "Righto, bring it with you for Friday Night dinner". As it's not a suitable form factor for an 80yo man though, we would plug in his existing peripherals. The problem is that it's a bit unwieldy to turn on and off if you have to worry about opening/closing the lid just to turn it on/off, sure it could stay open the whole time, but that's a bit unwieldy too.

My first thought was that "easy peasy, just look for one with a power button on the outside", but as you've pointed out a keyboard stroke would probably be a more logical suggestion any way. (The only reason it might not be more logical is that it's less conventional, which is noteworthy when talking about an 80yo man)

Mostly, this thread has convinced me that perhaps it might be better just getting a desktop.

Rob.

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Jeruselem 
2/9/08 9:45:52 AM
Guru

Well, you can lose a laptop by accident too ... it's really hard to lose a desktop.

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PC 1: XP Home SP2, Opty 165@1.8Ghz, GEIL 1GB PC3200, 320GB SATA Cuda ES,XFX 9600GSO 580/700x2/1450, Seasonic S12+ 550W
PC 2: XP Home SP3, XP 3000+@2.24 Ghz, 1GB PC3200, 80GB IDE,ASUS nVidia 6800 512MB, Antec PlanetWatts 380W

Linux_Inside V2 
2/9/08 10:32:23 AM
Immortal

I've seen a few dell notebooks with external power buttons of late, buggered if I can remember the model though.

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stadl 
2/9/08 2:07:29 PM
SuperHero
Titan


Quote by robzy
The logic of choosing a laptop is that if something goes wrong we can just say "Righto, bring it with you for Friday Night dinner". As it's not a suitable form factor for an 80yo man though, we would plug in his existing peripherals.



Desktop has Power cable, keyboard, mouse and monitor plugged in.

A Laptop as you describe it being used, has external Power supply, leyboard, mouse and monitor plugged in (I'm assuming by the statement of "existing peripherals" you're not expecting to switch to bluetooth keyboard & mouse)

Other than physical size, how is the laptop "easier" for an 80 YO to unplug and move?

-----
...so brilliant in fact, that by simply harnessing the power of one live frog, it.. it.. uhh.<poke> <poke>
World domination has encountered a momentary setback. Talk amongst yourselves.

Waffles, Lots of Waffles... And Chips...

Linux_Inside V2 
2/9/08 2:36:44 PM
Immortal

Quote by stadl
Quote by robzy
The logic of choosing a laptop is that if something goes wrong we can just say "Righto, bring it with you for Friday Night dinner". As it's not a suitable form factor for an 80yo man though, we would plug in his existing peripherals.



Desktop has Power cable, keyboard, mouse and monitor plugged in.

A Laptop as you describe it being used, has external Power supply, leyboard, mouse and monitor plugged in (I'm assuming by the statement of "existing peripherals" you're not expecting to switch to bluetooth keyboard & mouse)

Other than physical size, how is the laptop "easier" for an 80 YO to unplug and move?



Lighter, smaller, fits in a backpack, doesn't need to be plugged into a monitor or anything at robzys house etc

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tantryl 
2/9/08 3:26:04 PM
SuperHero
Immortal


Quote by robzy
It will be plugged into his existing keyboard, mouse, lcd, etc.



Yeah, I knew I'd missed a vital component somewhere.

For some reason this didn't click when I first read it.

I concur with whomever said it - you may as well just get a compact minimac-style eeePC-like box.

*EDIT* Quote by Linux_Inside V2
Lighter, smaller, fits in a backpack, doesn't need to be plugged into a monitor or anything at robzys house etc



And eee box is lighter and smaller than most laptops, and uses less power than even the Atom based eeePCs. Check it: http://www.techreport.com/articles.x/15234


Edited by tantryl: 2/9/2008 03:31:27 PM

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"It is the war we cannot win, nor can we lose nor drop. There is evidence of an instability of ideas, a floating series of judgements, our policy of nervous conciliation which is very disturbing."
- US Senator Hugh Scott

robzy 
3/9/08 5:22:04 PM
Hero
Immortal


Quote by Linux_Inside V2
Lighter, smaller, fits in a backpack, doesn't need to be plugged into a monitor or anything at robzys house etc


As above. Physically unplugging things from it is much easier, and physically moving it is much easier, and I don't really need any peripherals here to work on it.

Although ultimately, tantryl, I think you're right in suggesting that a (mATX) desktop would be the better way to go.

Rob.

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