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Do me deep baby [Gentoo]
robzy 
30/8/08 4:30:47 AM
Hero
Immortal


It's too late at night to phrase these questions up as paragraphs and whatnot :P Sorry.

1) How often do you do "emerge -uD world"? (The Deep part of that being the important part)

2) Does doing "emerge -uD world" move everything upgraded into world? If so, is there anyway to do it that doesn't involve moving them into world?

Rob.

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spielentwickler 
30/8/08 7:46:56 AM
Guru

I do a system update every week or two.

This usually involves the following:

sudo su -
eix-sync (which does an emerge --sync to update the package tree, a system update is pointless otherwise...)
emerge -va --update --deep --newuse world (the newuse will catch any useflag changes that I might have made since my last update, that I didn't bother updating the whole system for)

The deep ensures that updates for any dependencies for your world packages get included too.

If you just want to update your world applications, and not worry about updating the libraries, you can leave it out. If one of the updated packages requires a newer version of a dependency, it will get included anyway.

Doing an emerge -uD world will not change the contents of your world file. It reads the world file to find what applications you have installed, add all of them to the emerge, ensure all dependencies of these are met, and add these to the emerge (repeating this step each time a new package is added), and then if you used the -D flag, check any of the dependencies of the packages being emerged to see if there's an update that hasn't already been included and add it.

At most, you shouldn't do this more than once a day, because it's generally considered bad form to do a --sync more than once a day. Systems that require uptime should only be updated as necessary. And then you should be more selective about what gets updated. For desktop systems, like mine, I generally consider once a week to be a good starting point.

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Redhatter 
30/8/08 12:08:57 PM
Hero
Titan


I go several months before updating on such a large scale. The servers I look at do an update of system and world on a regular basis, but anything else is updated as-needed.

I'm pretty sure the world file isn't modified, but you can always store a backup of it, and write the backup back in place.

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robzy 
30/8/08 3:09:01 PM
Hero
Immortal


Cool, thanks guys :)

I tend to do an "emerge --sync & emerge -avu world" once every few weeks whenever the urge strikes me, it just occured to me last night that I have very rarely done an "emerge -avuD world" and was wondering how important it was to keep dependencies at the latest version.

Rob.

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spielentwickler 
30/8/08 3:31:31 PM
Guru

If there's a bug fix release on a dependency, not doing a --deep will miss it. So even if you update your program, the dependency bug could still effect it.

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robzy 
30/8/08 8:06:43 PM
Hero
Immortal


Ahh, that's a good point. As a whole though sounds like running a deep upgrade every month or so is good (which is when I tend to do my regular upgrade anyway).

Rob.

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elmo198 
31/8/08 4:50:36 AM
Champion

I dont even bother with updates, I follow this simple rule. "if it arent broke, dont fcsk with it."
there are exceptions, some services I might update, like apache, squid, iptables for security reasons. otherwise I dont bother.

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Deserted 
31/8/08 1:49:22 PM
Champion

I tend to run a sync followed by emerge -avuDn world each night, I found with some of the more bleeding-edge packages this resulted in breakages on upgrades less often then doing it either weekly or monthly, it also means updates are smaller :)

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spielentwickler 
31/8/08 9:01:58 PM
Guru

Deserted, it also means your power bill is going to be fairly high...

Also, do you compile a new kernel for each -r release?

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TheSecret 
31/8/08 9:16:45 PM
Overlord
These deep upgrades...are an advantage? If so, how?

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robzy 
31/8/08 10:07:01 PM
Hero
Immortal


Quote by TheSecret
These deep upgrades...are an advantage? If so, how?


Because it updates _all_ packages installed on your system, not just those in world. World includes only those you explicitly installed.

Like, let's just say you did "emerge -v superduper" and it also installed "depproggram" as a depandancy.

When you ran "emerge -vu world" it would only check if there is an update for superduper, not for depprogram.

Rob.


Edited by robzy: 31/8/2008 10:08:22 PM

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TheSecret 
31/8/08 10:53:13 PM
Overlord
Right, but that functionality is present in many other systems, so is this the same thing done in a different way or is there something extra?

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robzy 
1/9/08 12:01:56 AM
Hero
Immortal


Quote by TheSecret
Right, but that functionality is present in many other systems, so is this the same thing done in a different way or is there something extra?


Same thing done in a different way.

I know, in Ubuntu when you say "apt-get upgrade" it checks every single package. Gentoo does't do this, Gentoo only checks the packages you explicitly installed.

Rob.

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Deserted 
2/9/08 7:21:49 PM
Champion

Quote by spielentwickler
Deserted, it also means your power bill is going to be fairly high...

Also, do you compile a new kernel for each -r release?



yup

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Quote by Redhatter
It's aimed at people wanting a job as a Unix network admin, not point-and-click Windows Cowboys.



Quote by Takoma
Looks like you're the man Deserted.


robzy 
2/9/08 8:42:44 PM
Hero
Immortal


Quote by Deserted
Quote by spielentwickler
Deserted, it also means your power bill is going to be fairly high...

Also, do you compile a new kernel for each -r release?



yup


Seriously?

Rob.

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spielentwickler 
3/9/08 3:19:32 AM
Guru

Quote by Deserted
Quote by spielentwickler
Deserted, it also means your power bill is going to be fairly high...

Also, do you compile a new kernel for each -r release?



yup



Why bother?

If you've got a custom kernel, with only support for your hardware, a lot of -r releases won't actually change any code you're running...

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Deserted 
4/9/08 5:40:48 AM
Champion

Quote by spielentwickler
Quote by Deserted
Quote by spielentwickler
Deserted, it also means your power bill is going to be fairly high...

Also, do you compile a new kernel for each -r release?



yup



Why bother?

If you've got a custom kernel, with only support for your hardware, a lot of -r releases won't actually change any code you're running...



and by the same token, why not?

The only argument anyone has raised is power bill, and being the box folds 24/7 anyway, not really an issue.

for the ~3 minutes it takes me to do before heading off to bed,I see no reason not to

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Quote by Redhatter
It's aimed at people wanting a job as a Unix network admin, not point-and-click Windows Cowboys.



Quote by Takoma
Looks like you're the man Deserted.


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