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Freeing inodes?
iamthemaxx 
28/8/08 2:50:38 PM
Mod
SuperHero

Immortal


Is there a way to do this?

One of my partitions is at 94% use (74% data) and I am not sure what to do....



Running Debian Etch.

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robzy 
28/8/08 4:17:33 PM
Hero
Immortal


Have you considered http://boncey.org/2006_11_18_reclaiming_ext3_disk_space ?

Sorry I can't help with the actual question.

Rob.


Edited by robzy: 28/8/2008 4:17:49 PM

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עם ישראל חי

TheSecret 
28/8/08 6:52:50 PM
Overlord
Usually this would mean you have an abundance of small files, which can cause you to run out of space on a system with a fixed number of inodes.

Whatdoes df -i tell you?

You should either transfer as many small files as you can to a different partition, or use a better filesystem.

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Part of the inhumanity of the computer is that, once it is competently programmed and working smoothly, it is completely honest.

iamthemaxx 
5/9/08 11:24:20 PM
Mod
SuperHero

Immortal


The app we run generates hundreds of thousands of small files.

Basically (as I have found) the only out is to delete some files or recreate the FS with a higher inode count.

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TheSecret 
6/9/08 4:09:27 AM
Overlord
or, use a better filesystem.

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Part of the inhumanity of the computer is that, once it is
competently programmed and working smoothly, it is completely honest.

zebra 
6/9/08 10:54:40 AM
SuperHero
Titan


Quote by TheSecret
or, use a better filesystem.



As harsh as it sounds, I agree with TheSecret. If you want to be able to do this kind of thing on the fly (i.e - reserve, delete, append, expand) your inode trees, you really are in the market for a higher end filesystem man.

In an ideal situation, you have:

1. A LUN dedicated to data
2. A LUN dedicated to meta-data/inode count/tracking

Using a filesystem such as Lustre, ZFS or SAM-FS (and prolly several less esoteric ones I don't know of!) you could simply add slice to your metadata LUN to keep things happy.

The problem with filesystems such as EXT3 is that, as you know, total inode count is created at fs init time. XFS on the other hand will allow grow_xfs, expand_xfs, if I recall correctly.

"Deleting" inodes is a bit of a hairy concept. I mean, how do you prove that your inodes are unlinked/dissociated from the actual data?

Near as I can remember, one of the best ways to "clean up" stale trees is to fsck the filesystem with the repair flag -pcfv, or something to that effect.

The end game, which doesn't help you here, is that you are asking a filesystem to do something that it's old-school technology isn't capable of.

z



Edited by zebra: 6/9/2008 10:55:30 AM

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Specs:

I don't own a computer.

iamthemaxx 
6/9/08 11:45:17 AM
Mod
SuperHero

Immortal


It's not that I disagree, it's just that I don't have the resources to go and rebuild all our servers onto XFS (they are Debian), as much as I would love to.

Reality is a bitch ;)

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Linux_Inside V2 
6/9/08 11:56:58 AM
Immortal

Maxx

Are you having this problem on cPanel hosting servers?

If so, could you please PM Me? I've been trying to tackle a similar issue that's been causing havoc on a shared hosting environment...

Weird thing is that the systems aren't new, and the issue has only started happening recently across a few servers even though we're not adding more accounts.
MySQL seems to be deleting files and not freeing inodes...

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iamthemaxx 
6/9/08 12:22:57 PM
Mod
SuperHero

Immortal


Nope, not cPanel.

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spielentwickler 
8/9/08 9:58:48 AM
Guru

If you want to change filesystems, check out convertfs.

There's a gentoo forums post here about it http://forums.gentoo.org/viewtopic.php?t=13811

As it says, make sure all important data is backedup first. If you've got multiple machines you might want to try on one first.

Can I say, if you do choose to convert, I'd actually recommend JFS over XFS for this. JFS, even though it hasn't been around much in Linux, is a tried and true FS. It's low on cpu time, but still manages to be fairly efficient speed-wise.

I've found through my research and experience that XFS is best for file systems storing large files (however is still good for lots of small files). I've read that it's fantastic as a file system for storing/recording media. I use it for my media library, while I use JFS for /

You might want to check out http://linuxgazette.net/102/piszcz.html and http://www.linux.com/feature/31939

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http://www.last.fm/user/spielentwickler/

TheSecret 
8/9/08 5:05:26 PM
Overlord
Just to second spielentwickler, JFS would be ideal for your situation.

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Part of the inhumanity of the computer is that, once it is
competently programmed and working smoothly, it is completely honest.

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